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Girl Scouts at Home

When girls take the lead, great things happen! Even though your daily routine may have changed, there are many ways to participate in the Girl Scout Leadership Experience through our Girl Scouts at Home activities and earn awards! 

Please note, this resource is not inclusive of every activity Girl Scouts can do at home. Check out the complete list of Girl Scout Badges and Journeys online at the Badge Explorer to understand basic requirements.

As a Girl Scout, you’re part of your troop, council, and the nationwide movement. We can’t be together in person, but we can be together in spirit and stay connected to our sisterhood online. Troop meetings are amazing, but being a Girl Scout doesn’t stop there.

All girls—even if you’re not a Girl Scout yet!—are invited to participate in these Girl Scouts at Home activities! Share this page with a friend and invite them to join in on the virtual fun.

GSUSA has put together some additional resources, check it out!

Once you complete a badge, just click on the badge title to order it. Maybe you can even learn how to sew it on the front of your sash or vest!

Girl Scouts at Home Challenge
The Girl Scouts at Home Challenge is over, but you can still order the patch from our store by emailing store@gseok.org. Patches can be worn on the back of your sash or vest.
 
Get Outside! Challenge
We want Girl Scouts to GET OUTSIDE in every season! To earn this season’s Get Outside! patch, complete the number of activities for your level (at bottom of page) by the end of Summer - September 21.
 

LIFE SKILLS

Daisy

Zinni – Considerate and Caring Daisy Petal

  1. Watch Zinni's Story and answer these questions:
    • Why did Zinni forget to be considerate and caring? What reminded her? 
    • How do you think the flower friends felt when they shared their paints, crayons, and coloring books? 
    • How can you practice being considerate and caring? 
  2. Paint (or color) your own picture of flower friends!
    • You could even try painting without a paintbrush! Find an item around your house, and test it out for painting - but make sure you ask first, and that an adult is okay sharing with you!
    • The sky's the limit! Here are some ideas you could try: yarn, string, cotton swab, cotton ball, a leaf, the tip of a pencil eraser. 
  3. Paint (or color) a picture to share with someone else! Consider their favorite colors, and what type of picture would make them really happy to see.
Brownie

Brownie Painting Badge

  1. Get inspired to paint! 
    • Take a virtual tour of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. or the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands. 
    • Which paintings are your favorite? 
    • What do you like about them? 
    • What do your favorite paintings have in common? 
  2. Painting what’s around you is the first step in becoming an artist! 
    • Paint something from the real world—a person, a pet, or an object. 
    • Consider shadows, colors and lighting. 
  3. Create abstract art—pretend you are an artist who is trying to paint a mood. 
    • Use colors, lines, and shapes to paint two different moods. What colors and shapes would you use for a happy mood? What colors and shapes would you paint for a mad mood? You can paint happy and mad on two different sides of a paper, or you can paint on two different papers.
    • Have shaving cream, glue, and food coloring? This puffy paint would be a fun way to paint your mood! 
  4. Try painting without a paintbrush! (Get permission.)
    • Find an item around your house, and test it out for painting. The sky's the limit! 
    • Here are some ideas you could try: yarn, string, cotton swab, cotton ball, a leaf, the tip of a pencil eraser. You might have to be creative in how you paint with these everyday objects! 
    • Do you have bubbles and paint? Try painting with bubbles! 
  5.  A mural is a really big painting that tells a story. 
    • Sometimes murals are painted on buildings or walls. Have you ever seen a mural around town?  
    • Use a big piece of paper (or a regular sized paper, or a few taped together) to paint your own mural that tells YOUR story. You can paint about your favorite Girl Scout experience, a story you love, or a favorite memory!
Junior

Junior Drawing Badge

  1. Find your favorite drawing tool, called a “medium.” 
    • Pick an object (i.e. an apple, a toy, your water bottle, etc.) and draw it three times with three different mediums. 
    • You can pick any 3 drawing tools to test, but here are some ideas: pencil, mechanical pencil, black pen, felt pen, colored pencils, crayon, skinny marker, fat marker, gel pen, etc. 
  2. Shading is a major part of drawing. Depending on the light, items appear lighter or darker. Showing the darker areas is shading. Shading adds depth, and makes the picture look more real. 
    • Practice shading by pushing harder on your pencil/crayon on the edges, and shading lighter (pushing lighter) in the middle. 
  3. Practice perspective! How would an object look if you were a bug? 
    • Draw a picture showing what a bug would see if they were looking at an object (i.e. a flower, grass, a sandwich, etc.). 
    • Fill your entire paper, since a bug would see everything as SUPER HUGE. 
  4. Use your imagination like a graphic artist. A graphic artist’s job is to use art to communicate ideas in a visual form. Graphic artists typically work on a computer. Try drawing like a graphic artist! 
    • Check out some examples of cartoons online, in magazines or newspaper, or books, and then design your own cartoon. 
    • You can sketch out the details from head to toe, and you can include any silly details you want—a talking dog, a funny hat, etc. 
    • For added fun write a comic strip starring your character! 
  5. Make a masterpiece, and show it off! Use the skills you learned to create a drawing, and share it through email, texts or online with family and friends.
Cadette

Cadette Comic Artist Badge

  1. Newspaper cartoons, comic books, graphic novels… comic art is a broad and growing field! Comics are sometimes called “sequential art,” though some are only one panel. Comics are a visual story told however you would like to tell it! 
    • Delve into the world of comic artists. Research different comic strips from various decades.
  2. Comics are a method of storytelling. Think of a story you want to tell—it can be based on real life or something you make up. Choose characters, the situation, and then the comic gag. Keep your story simple! 
    • For example: A family is walking up to a house with a new puppy.
    • Through the window, you see a cat packing her suitcase.             
    • The one-liner: “This house isn’t big enough for the both of us!” 
    • Characters: The family, the puppy, and the cat. 
  3. Start drawing your characters. 
    • Use scratch paper, and start sketching out what your character(s) look like. 
    • Stick figures are great to bring to life! 
    • Start quickly, keep drawing and drawing and drawing! 
    • You can refine the details as you go. 
  4. It’s time to put your characters and story together! 
    • Draw 4 panels (aka boxes) or use 4 sticky notes to show a series of actions in your story. 
    • Consider facial expressions and/or movement as you tell your story in the 4 boxes. 
  5. Add words to your comic strip! 
    • You can use dialogue (talking), thought bubbles, or running narrative at the bottom of each panel to help tell your story. 
    • Pro tip: If you have multiple characters speaking in one panel, the character on the left should speak first.
Senior

Senior Collage Badge

  1. Explore collages. Research collage artists through the years. 
    • Read about the artists, and view their art. 
    • What composition, colors, materials, and messages stick out to you?
  2. Learn about and compose a collage using Cubomania. 
    • Find an image (from a magazine, a picture, or something you print), and cut the image into little squares. 
    • Reassemble by gluing squares onto another piece of paper. 
    • You may try to recreate the image, or place the squares randomly. 
  3. Learn about the color wheel, and consider how colors can help express your emotions. 
    • Create a collage using only one color, or with a color theme (i.e. Patriotic colors, your school colors, etc.). 
    • You can use magazines, advertisements, junk mail, and scrap paper, or you can create an electronic collage using images. 
  4. Create a collage using items you find at your house. 
    • For example, a food themed collage might have a sugar packet, a noodle, a napkin, and an empty cereal box.
    • Keep in mind, any surface could be a collage - a piece of paper, cardboard, empty cereal box. 
    • You could even set your items on a table or the floor, snap a picture, and put your items back!
    • More ideas: Girl Scout items, school items, STEM/gaming, recycling, items that start with the letter “A”, etc. 
  5. Create a collage to share a message. 
    • Either create a collage that represents you, OR create a collage that shares a message about a cause you believe in! 
    • You can use paper, found items, or create your collage digitally.
Ambassador

Ambassador Photography Badge

Before you begin, get familiar with your camera. Read the camera manual, get to know the basic setup and buttons, settings for light and exposure, etc. A point and shoot camera or a camera phone are great options, too! 

  1. Explore Photography by visiting an online gallery.
    • Check out The Center of Creative Photography, or the International Center of Photography, and look at least 20 photographs. 
    • Try to figure out the story the photo is telling, and note what elements make it a powerful photograph. 
  2. Learn about photography composition like rule of thirds, framing, depth, and lead lines. 
    • Keep this in mind, and take five different photos of a landscape with various vantage points. 
    • Capture the picture from above, below, and at all different angles. 
  3. Shoot a portrait! 
    • Ask someone at home (person, pet, stuffed animal) to sit for a portrait. 
    • Consider the location (Kitchen? Their room? Backyard?), wardrobe, and props. 
    • Play around with the placement of people and objects to create 5 different photos. 
  4. Focus on Motion
    • Shoot 5 action shots. 
    • Try to stop motion and retain a sense of movement. 
    • Photograph five different objects in motion - a basketball, a leaf falling, water running in the sink, a bird flying, a dog’s tail, etc. 
  5. Use your new skills to take a photo(s) that tells a story or means something to you, and share in an exhibit or share with family and friends through social media.


OUTDOORS

Daisy

Art in the Outdoors Badge

  • Color an outdoor scene.
  • Make a painting of the outdoors.
  • Tell a story with art - draw a self-portrait of you helping the environment.
  • Draw something that makes a sound outdoors.
  • Search for sounds in nature or your back yard and write them down.
  • Make a musical instrument using materials from outside.

Eco Learner Badge

  • What types of things are found in nature?
  • Look for wildlife in your back yard. Make a chart or list showing all the animals or insects you found.
  • Have your Daisy reach into a box or bag and try and guess what is inside. Is it something that you find in nature or was it something you might find in the house?
  • Draw your nature identity – what do you love about nature most?
  • Create a circle with a hula hoop, string or anything else you can find. Place your circle in various points around your yard and identify what you see. Why is it important to stay on a path in the woods?
  • Try to remember everything you found in nature and make a list.

Trail Adventure

Go on a jog while you explore the outdoors, or you can go on a hike and play games!

  1. Choose your outdoor adventure
    • Draw two different adventure pictures! Imagine you are jogging around the block and draw a picture of where you’d go! Draw a picture of yourself hiking up a trail with the plants, animals, all around! 
  2. Prepare for your adventure!
    • Get ready by creating a plan with your family and make a list of supplies you’ll need (backpack? rain jacket? sunscreen?) Make sure to wear good shoes! And always have an adult with you on your adventure! 
    • Practice breathing from your belly. When you breathe, you get oxygen and oxygen give you energy for your adventure!  Stretch and warm up your muscles
  3. Go on your outdoor adventure! It’s time for the best part! Make it even more special by adding more fun!
    • For jogging, add a new movement every 30 steps. You might skip or hop. For hiking, maybe take a compass and learn how to find north. What special fun will you be adding to your adventure?   ABC Scavenger Hunt & I-Spy Activity

Urban Hiking (verb): taking a walk through your neighborhood or city with a sense of adventure! 

Find natural beauty and fun obstacles right outside your front door! Explore the urban environment around you by wandering through your neighborhood and nearby parks; visiting landmarks and cool buildings; and appreciating the connection between city and nature.

How to get ready for your adventure: 
Step 1: Plan your route - Use Google Maps to locate green spaces, landmarks, or anything else you want to explore within walking distance of your house. Plan your route and get excited about what you’re going to see along the way. Remember to choose roads that aren’t too busy so you can focus your senses on your hike. 

Step 2: Dress and pack appropriately - Check the weather–grab a jacket, hat, and sunglasses, if you need them and don’t forget your sunscreen! Put a water bottle and a snack in your bag and hit the pavement with a family member!

Ways to add adventure to your hike: 

  • Sing a hiking song. Sing a Girl Scouts hiking song while you explore your neighborhood. Here’s a link to great songs to learn and sing as you walk: https://www.youtube.com/user/GirlScoutSongs
  • Find nature all around you. Take breaks to look up at the sky, watch the clouds, feel the sun on your face, and listen to the birds. Wander through the green spaces and parks you find and see what trees, grasses, bugs, and critters live there. Notice differences and similarities along your route. 
  • Write in a journal. Journaling is a great way to record your experiences and your observations as you learn new things about your neighborhood. 
  • Learn about your town’s history and culture. As you walk around you might find old buildings and landmarks that you’ve never noticed before. Write about what you find and look it up when you get home. When was your city founded? Who used to live in your area? What traditions/buildings/businesses have remained and what is different now? 

Share your story with us! We’d love to hear about how you are exploring your city and neighborhood while enjoying nature! Send photos of you/your girl(s) to  news@gseok.org.

Brownie

Outdoor Adventurer Badge

  • Write down anything you might see on a nature walk.
  • Play nature charades with your family where you act out anything you previously wrote down.
  • Create an obstacle course in your back yard with your caregivers’ approval. See how fast you can complete it.
  • Go on a nature scavenger hunt or play nature bingo in your yard.
  • After your hunt write down what you saw, heard or smell. How did being outside make you feel?
  • Make a cloud board or paper using cotton balls – then identify what types of clouds are in the sky today.
    • Cirrus clouds – these are high wispy clouds that almost look like air.
    • Cumulus clouds – these are fat puffy clouds that generally form on clear days.
    • Cumulonimbus clouds – these are thick, low hanging clouds.
    • Stratus clouds – these are low clouds that almost look like a fog that can’t touch the ground.
  • Make a necklace using materials you already have that resembles the sun. Try and practice knot tying while making your necklace or learn how to build a fire by building an edible fire.
  • Listen to the trees. Sit under multiple trees and see if they sound different in the wind.

Outdoor Art Creator Badge

  • Take a walk in your back yard and write down all the natural things you see (flowers, grass, trees etc.). As you write them down, note what shape they resemble.
  • Create a color wheel using crayons or markers you already have, put similar colors next to one another. Take a walk outside and see what colors your find in nature. Did you find anything not in your color wheel?
  • Make a leaf or tree bark rubbing. If you use a leaf, take it from the ground not the branch of a tree. Hold a piece of paper over the bark of a tree or on top of a leaf and use the side of a crayon or chalk to make a rubbing.
  • What do architects do? They design and build structures. What would your house look like if you can only use what you find in nature? What do birds, rabbits or bees use?
  • Nature dance time – make a list of insects or animals and mimic how they move.
  • Make a wind chime out of materials you find in nature such as sticks and acorns. You will need to use some craft supplies to hold it all together!
  • Ask a parent to use their phone to learn about nature photography and take some close ups of things you find in nature. Take a close up, an outdoor scene or maybe a cloud in the sky.

Bugs Badge

  • Make a bug out of craft supplies and learn about your bug (spider, ladybug, caterpillar, etc.).
  • Learn about caterpillars and come up with a song or dance about their transformation into butterflies.
  • Use something you already have, or make a bug viewing box. Make it comfortable and add grass or twigs so you can find a bug to view up close. Be sure to release the bugs once you are finished viewing them. You can also watch a bug in its natural habitat in order to not disturb them.
  • Look for bugs outdoors in your back yard, what did you find? Can you draw a picture?
  • What insects pollinate? Do you have any in your back yard? Go on a search near flowers if you have any.

Trail Adventure

Go trail running or take different kinds of hikes (night hike, urban hike, rain hike, photo hike taking pictures along the way, etc).

  1. Choose your outdoor adventure! What kind of adventure will make your heart sing? 
    • Try both and choose your favorite! First go on a short run in a grassy area. Run fast, run slow, and take in the sights. Next, go on a walk in the same area. Explore by noticing your senses. What do you see? What do you hear? Smell a flower and touch bark of a tree, etc. 
  2. Plan and prepare! Pick a place, day, & time. 
    • Learn the language of your adventure.
    • Watch this video about Leave No Trace principles. How will you protect trails on your outdoor adventure? Share your plan with your family. For more fun, find out how you can volunteer to clean up a trail near you!
  3. Gather your gear. Part of being prepared is making sure you have the right gear
    • Does a family member or family friend run or hike? Set up a phone call or video chat to ask what gear they take on their adventures. Do they add any more equipment to the list? What type of shoes do they wear and why? How much water do they pack? Anything else?
  4. Train for your adventure. Get your mind and body ready for the challenge!
    • Do a practice run around the block or take a short hike with your family. Read this comic and come up with a training plan. 
  5. It’s time to go on your outdoor adventure!
    • Find out how to shoot an action video and video your adventure to show friends and family. Or plan an adventure game like a scavenger hunt, etc. Capture your thoughts about your adventure; you can write in a journal or use a smartphone voice recorder.  ABC Scavenger Hunt & I-Spy Activity

Urban Hiking (verb): taking a walk through your neighborhood or city with a sense of adventure! 

Find natural beauty and fun obstacles right outside your front door! Explore the urban environment around you by wandering through your neighborhood and nearby parks; visiting landmarks and cool buildings; and appreciating the connection between city and nature.

How to get ready for your adventure: 
Step 1: Plan your route - Use Google Maps to locate green spaces, landmarks, or anything else you want to explore within walking distance of your house. Plan your route and get excited about what you’re going to see along the way. Remember to choose roads that aren’t too busy so you can focus your senses on your hike. 

Step 2: Dress and pack appropriately - Check the weather–grab a jacket, hat, and sunglasses, if you need them and don’t forget your sunscreen! Put a water bottle and a snack in your bag and hit the pavement with a family member!

Ways to add adventure to your hike: 

  • Sing a hiking song. Sing a Girl Scouts hiking song while you explore your neighborhood. Here’s a link to great songs to learn and sing as you walk: https://www.youtube.com/user/GirlScoutSongs
  • Find nature all around you. Take breaks to look up at the sky, watch the clouds, feel the sun on your face, and listen to the birds. Wander through the green spaces and parks you find and see what trees, grasses, bugs, and critters live there. Notice differences and similarities along your route. 
  • Write in a journal. Journaling is a great way to record your experiences and your observations as you learn new things about your neighborhood. 
  • Learn about your town’s history and culture. As you walk around you might find old buildings and landmarks that you’ve never noticed before. Write about what you find and look it up when you get home. When was your city founded? Who used to live in your area? What traditions/buildings/businesses have remained and what is different now? 

Share your story with us! We’d love to hear about how you are exploring your city and neighborhood while enjoying nature! Send photos of you/your girl(s) to  news@gseok.org.


Eco Friend

Find out how to treat outdoor spaces with kindness and teach others how they can, too.

  1. Think of ways to help the outdoors 
    • Make a poster showing all the ways you can care for the environment or make up a song about the different ways to take care of the environment. Share or Sing to your family when you are finished! Or color this picture: Eco Friends Coloring Page
  2. Observe outdoor spaces
    • Take a closer look! With binoculars, a magnifying glass, or just YOU, take a closer look at a flower pot, plant, rock, pinecone, etc. Why do you think you should leave the object in nature?
  3. Build a safe campfire 
  4. Take care of wildlife 
    • Think of ways that humans might be disrespectful of that animal's living space? Maybe there are no flowers left for a rabbit to eat because people picked them all, or a deer is afraid to come to its favorite place in the woods because it hears loud music playing. Draw (or paint) a picture of your favorite wild animal. How do you think humans can treat the animal’s living space with kindness? Here are some tips!
  5. Practice being kind 
    • Do you know an outdoor space that could use a little love? Come up with ideas for ways to leave an outdoor area better, then talk to an adult about how you could put your plan to action!  (During these social distancing times, make sure you are staying safe! Perhaps come up with a plan you’ll be able to execute later!)
Junior

Outdoor Art Explorer Badge

  • Draw or find a picture in a magazine of an animal or insect you have seen in nature or would like to see in nature.
  • Write a song about Leave No Trace and caring for the outdoors. Sing it to someone you live with.
  • Make a necklace out of materials you find in nature or your back yard. You may need to utilize some craft supplies you have on hand for this activity.
  • Make a bird house out of an old milk jug and decorate it before putting it out for the birds.
  • Find things in nature to create a musical instrument. Be creative! (You may need to use some manmade things to finish off the instrument).
  • Use a digital camera or phone to take photographs of nature. Take a macro picture (something from a distance) or a micro (something close up) picture.

Animal Habitats Badge

  • Draw or write about your favorite wild animal. What type of habitat do they live in?
  • List what type of animals live in the following habitats: Forest, Grasslands, Desert or Tundra. What do these habitats all have in common?
  • Design a habitat using supplies you have on hand. It can be 3D or you can draw it, be sure to include food, water and shelter. With an adult, learn about Leave No Trace and take the online Leave No Trace Awareness Course.
  • Conduct an experiment, what is the best way to clean up an oil spill? Place water and oil in a bin and then use different materials such as dish soap, laundry detergent, feathers, plastics bags or cotton balls to try and soak the oil up. Make a hypothesis of which will work best and why. Which one did work best?
  • Learn about an endangered animal of your choice.
  • Write down ways you can help animals for a Take Action project!

Trail Adventure

Go on a trail run for a distance that challenges you, or train for and go on three separate day hikes. 

  1. Choose your outdoor adventure
    • On a mood board, draw and write thoughts and words that represent what running and hiking mean to you. Add photos or drawings- be creative! When finished talk to your family about which of the two adventures you think you’d enjoy more and why. 
  2. Plan and prepare! Pick a place to go, research and write down the difficulty of trail, distance, terrain, what weather may be like, etc. 
  3. Gather your gear. Be prepared with the right gear for your adventure. Try to borrow gear from family or friends so you don’t need to buy it. 
    • Watch this video about gear! 
  4. Set a goal and train for your adventure.
    • Practice Mind Training: athletes often use things like visualization and positive self-talk to help them feel energized, calm, and focused. Take a practice run or short hike with your family. 
  5. Time to go on your outdoor adventures!
    • Find out how to shoot an action video and video your adventure to show friends and family. Or plan an adventure game like a scavenger hunt, etc. Capture your thoughts about your adventure; you can write in a journal or use a smartphone voice recorder.

Urban Hiking (verb): taking a walk through your neighborhood or city with a sense of adventure! 

Find natural beauty and fun obstacles right outside your front door! Explore the urban environment around you by wandering through your neighborhood and nearby parks; visiting landmarks and cool buildings; and appreciating the connection between city and nature.

How to get ready for your adventure: 
Step 1: Plan your route - Use Google Maps to locate green spaces, landmarks, or anything else you want to explore within walking distance of your house. Plan your route and get excited about what you’re going to see along the way. Remember to choose roads that aren’t too busy so you can focus your senses on your hike. 

Step 2: Dress and pack appropriately - Check the weather–grab a jacket, hat, and sunglasses, if you need them and don’t forget your sunscreen! Put a water bottle and a snack in your bag and hit the pavement with a family member!

Ways to add adventure to your hike: 

  • Sing a hiking song. Sing a Girl Scouts hiking song while you explore your neighborhood. Here’s a link to great songs to learn and sing as you walk: https://www.youtube.com/user/GirlScoutSongs
  • Find nature all around you. Take breaks to look up at the sky, watch the clouds, feel the sun on your face, and listen to the birds. Wander through the green spaces and parks you find and see what trees, grasses, bugs, and critters live there. Notice differences and similarities along your route. 
  • Write in a journal. Journaling is a great way to record your experiences and your observations as you learn new things about your neighborhood. 
  • Learn about your town’s history and culture. As you walk around you might find old buildings and landmarks that you’ve never noticed before. Write about what you find and look it up when you get home. When was your city founded? Who used to live in your area? What traditions/buildings/businesses have remained and what is different now? 

Share your story with us! We’d love to hear about how you are exploring your city and neighborhood while enjoying nature! Send photos of you/your girl(s) to  news@gseok.org.


Eco Camper

Find out how to protect the environment when you go on a camping trip.

  1. Learn the Leave No Trace Seven Principles 
    • Watch this video to help you learn the 7 principles then make a Leave No Trace presentation for your family! Teach them the movements to each principal to help you remember!
  2. Plan meals with the environment in mind 
  3. Prepare a minimal impact campsite 
  4. Have fun with Leave No Trace 
    • Play a game! Act out a skit! Or draw a comic about Leave No Trace.
  5. Take a conservation hike 
Cadette

Night Owl Badge

  • Research nocturnal animals that live in your area. What do their eyes look like at night? How are their eyes designed to see at night?
  • Do the Leave No Trace Awareness Course to learn how to respect animals. How might this be different at night?
  • Go into your backyard at night and look up at the sky. If it’s clear look at the stars and draw the constellations you see. Write a short story about the night time sky.
  • Make a list and research jobs that happen in overnight hours. Try and talk to someone on the phone who has a night job. What are some questions you might have for people who work night shifts?
  • To complete this badge, talk to friends on how you would plan a night party, what games you could play outdoors, what light sources you might need, etc.

Outdoor Art Apprentice Badge

  • Find a spot in your back yard to sit and draw the scene at different times throughout the day. What is different in the morning vs. night?
  • Sit outside and mimic the sounds you hear or write a rap or poem inspired by sounds in nature.
  • Take photos of textures or patterns you find in your back yard, create an outdoor photo journal or take photos of things that are camouflaged.
  • Design a square foot garden on paper or build something with nature.
  • To complete the badge, dye something you can wear with naturally made colors, make nature art out of clay, or make seed paper.

Trees Badge

  • What is your favorite tree and why? Draw your favorite tree and do some research about it. Label the parts of the tree after you are done drawing – be sure to get all the layers and parts in.
  • Design a tree house – either drawing or creating a 3D structure.
  • Create your dream tree garden on paper, what type of trees will you include? Why? Will you have fruit trees?
  • Create a piece of art using parts of trees you find on the ground.
  • To complete this badge you will need to plant a tree or learn from an expert on how to care for trees – online research works here.

Trail Adventure

Test your grit by taking on a challenge that builds your endurance and strength (both physical and mental). Choose your adventure: Go on a long distance run at a comfortable pace; aim for 3 mile distance OR Hike 3 hikes, 1 with elevation changes, one covering a long distance (10mi), and one with a different terrain from previous hikes that’s about 6hours long. 

  1. Choose your outdoor adventure
    • Find an expert trail runner or hiker to talk to! Set up a phone call or video chat to find out what they like best about the sport. Watch a video or read a book about trail running and hiking. Do your own research and decide whether you want to run or hike. 
  2. Plan and prepare
    • Words to know
    • Pick a destination and research! On a piece of paper write down the trail’s difficulty level, fitness level needed for trail, weather, water sources along trail, remoteness of trail, wildlife along trail, etc. Look online at trail reports from fellow hikers, etc. The more you know about your destination, the better your experience will be. 
  3. Gather your gear.  Research the gear you will need, how it is used, and how to get it. 
  4. Set a goal and train for your adventure.  Get mentally and physically prepared. 
    • Use these training tips, follow safety tips like always training with an adult, knowing your route, and learning first aid skills for situations that may arise on the trail then take a practice run or hike. 
  5. Go on your outdoor adventure!
    • Create your action portfolio by having a family member take action photos and videos form your training sessions and on your adventure. Share these with family and friends to tell them about your experience. Or keep an adventure journal with notes on how far you ran or hiked. What you liked most or least about the activity. There are some free apps where you could document your journey too! 

Urban Hiking (verb): taking a walk through your neighborhood or city with a sense of adventure! 

Find natural beauty and fun obstacles right outside your front door! Explore the urban environment around you by wandering through your neighborhood and nearby parks; visiting landmarks and cool buildings; and appreciating the connection between city and nature.

How to get ready for your adventure: 
Step 1: Plan your route - Use Google Maps to locate green spaces, landmarks, or anything else you want to explore within walking distance of your house. Plan your route and get excited about what you’re going to see along the way. Remember to choose roads that aren’t too busy so you can focus your senses on your hike. 

Step 2: Dress and pack appropriately - Check the weather–grab a jacket, hat, and sunglasses, if you need them and don’t forget your sunscreen! Put a water bottle and a snack in your bag and hit the pavement with a family member!

Ways to add adventure to your hike: 

  • Sing a hiking song. Sing a Girl Scouts hiking song while you explore your neighborhood. Here’s a link to great songs to learn and sing as you walk: https://www.youtube.com/user/GirlScoutSongs
  • Find nature all around you. Take breaks to look up at the sky, watch the clouds, feel the sun on your face, and listen to the birds. Wander through the green spaces and parks you find and see what trees, grasses, bugs, and critters live there. Notice differences and similarities along your route. 
  • Write in a journal. Journaling is a great way to record your experiences and your observations as you learn new things about your neighborhood. 
  • Learn about your town’s history and culture. As you walk around you might find old buildings and landmarks that you’ve never noticed before. Write about what you find and look it up when you get home. When was your city founded? Who used to live in your area? What traditions/buildings/businesses have remained and what is different now? 

Share your story with us! We’d love to hear about how you are exploring your city and neighborhood while enjoying nature! Send photos of you/your girl(s) to  news@gseok.org.


Eco Trekker

Plan and take an outdoor trek—with minimal environmental impact.

  1. Learn how to make minimal impact on a trek 
  2. Plan an eco trek with a purpose 
    • Start by deciding where to spend your time in nature- nearby park? Trails to explore? With a family member, plan your trek! Go somewhere you haven’t been before and address an environmental issue. Talk with an experienced hiker, outdoor retailer, water treatment plant, state park, etc. to learn about air or water issues, etc. - call or email during this time of social distancing! Making a list of the several agencies in Oklahoma that helps conserve and protect our environment could be a great way to start!
  3. Practice an eco skill on your trek
  4. Make a difference on your eco trek 
    • Now is your chance to act like an environmental explorer! Select an issue that means something to you, whether water, land, or wildlife. On your trek, take notes, observe, and come up with possible solutions to help. It’s now time to put your ideas into action!
  5. Make a difference after your eco trek
    • You completed your eco trek- hooray! Make a video of your eco trek to share with your family and talk about possible solutions to your environmental issue afterwards OR create awareness to get the word out in your community about the environmental issue you explored. 
Senior

Outdoor Art Expert Badge

  1. Research at least three or more local public outdoor artworks.
    • Think about outdoor art that people enjoy—it could be statues, sculptures, murals, plaques, billboards, a fountain, landscaped gardens, or unusually designed buildings.
    • Use a journal to write about or sketch the art. 
  2. Find five things that do not belong in nature and create a collage or eco-art sculpture. 
    • Gather things around your house that you have seen discarded in nature when you were hiking or walking on an empty trail, by a lake, or around your neighborhood to pick up trash—from candy wrappers and soda cans to discarded tires and plastic toys—and then create something. (Safety note: Always wear gloves when collecting items, and avoid anything sharp, like needles, or toxic, like paint cans.)
    • You can plaster your findings into a sculpture, or glue them to canvas with pictures, drawings, and writing for a multimedia project. 
    • Name your art piece and include a brief description for what you want to say about preserving the environment, then display it or share with family about your piece. 
  3. Learn three camp songs about nature and record them to teach to younger girls later.
    • Help keep the Girl Scout singing tradition alive for younger girls by recording and sharing three nature songs. 
    • You can find a song about nature or take a traditional Girl Scout song and change the lyrics to reflect nature. 
    • Make sure to include movements and animal sounds when you share the songs— it makes it easier to remember the lyrics, and who doesn’t like to move to music? 
  4. Create a time-lapse project of a scene outdoors.
    • Take pictures of an object outdoors in a single frame at a time over a period of time—a day, week, or month. 
    • It might be clouds in the sky or plants and flowers growing. 
    • Then load the images on a computer or use an app to make a time-lapse video. 
    • Or print out three of your images and put them together side-by-side to create a triptych. 
    • For More FUN: Print out your time-lapse photos and make them into a flipbook. 
  5. Design an outdoor maze or labyrinth.
    • A puzzle maze has multiple paths, including wrong turns and dead ends, but only one way to get from entrance to goal. 
    • No matter how complicated, a labyrinth has a single winding path without choices. 
    • Pick one to design, and draw up your sketch. 
    • Then use pieces of rope, sidewalk chalk, or stones to replicate your design outdoors— maybe in your backyard. Invite family to walk through it.

Trail Adventure

An Outdoor Adventure is the ultimate. Challenge yourself by taking part of a 5k/10k trail race or a 3day/2night backpacking trip. 

  1. Choose your outdoor adventure.
    • Talk to a competitive trail runner or an experienced backpacker to gain information, watch videos, read books about each topic, explore what you will do and do your own research too! 
  2. Plan and prepare
    • Know the language
    • All Trails is an app to find trails in your area. There are many more like it. 
  3. Gather your gear. Be prepared with the right gear for your adventure. Try to borrow gear from family or friends so you don’t need to buy it.
    • Watch this video about gear!  
  4. Set a goal and train for your adventure. Write down a goal for what you want to achieve!
    • Get mentally and physically prepared. Use these training tips, follow safety tips like always training with a trusted friend or adult, make sure another adult know your route and estimated time you should return. Know your route and learn first aid skills for situations that may arise on the trail then take a practice run or hike. 
    • Get expert training tips by asking a running coach or experienced hiker to give you tips on goals and training. Go online to search outdoor organizations publications, and retail websites that offer valuable information and advice. 
  5. Go on your outdoor adventure! (Many races or campsites may be cancelled during this social distancing time. Use this time to train and prepare for when activities can resume!)
    • Remember: Always run or hike with a buddy. Leave emergency contact names and numbers of everyone going on the adventure, include where you are going including trail names, etc. check your gear, the weather, trail race details/backpacking permits if needed. 
    • Create an action portfolio taking pictures and videos from your training sessions and adventure. Keep an adventure journal of your thoughts and feelings through each phase of your adventures. 

Urban Hiking (verb): taking a walk through your neighborhood or city with a sense of adventure! 

Find natural beauty and fun obstacles right outside your front door! Explore the urban environment around you by wandering through your neighborhood and nearby parks; visiting landmarks and cool buildings; and appreciating the connection between city and nature.

How to get ready for your adventure: 
Step 1: Plan your route - Use Google Maps to locate green spaces, landmarks, or anything else you want to explore within walking distance of your house. Plan your route and get excited about what you’re going to see along the way. Remember to choose roads that aren’t too busy so you can focus your senses on your hike. 

Step 2: Dress and pack appropriately - Check the weather–grab a jacket, hat, and sunglasses, if you need them and don’t forget your sunscreen! Put a water bottle and a snack in your bag and hit the pavement with a family member!

Ways to add adventure to your hike: 

  • Sing a hiking song. Sing a Girl Scouts hiking song while you explore your neighborhood. Here’s a link to great songs to learn and sing as you walk: https://www.youtube.com/user/GirlScoutSongs
  • Find nature all around you. Take breaks to look up at the sky, watch the clouds, feel the sun on your face, and listen to the birds. Wander through the green spaces and parks you find and see what trees, grasses, bugs, and critters live there. Notice differences and similarities along your route. 
  • Write in a journal. Journaling is a great way to record your experiences and your observations as you learn new things about your neighborhood. 
  • Learn about your town’s history and culture. As you walk around you might find old buildings and landmarks that you’ve never noticed before. Write about what you find and look it up when you get home. When was your city founded? Who used to live in your area? What traditions/buildings/businesses have remained and what is different now? 

Share your story with us! We’d love to hear about how you are exploring your city and neighborhood while enjoying nature! Send photos of you/your girl(s) to  news@gseok.org.


Eco Explorer

Become an eco explorer as you get hands-on experience with environmental issues and help make positive changes to the environment. Take the Leave No Trace Online Awareness Course

  1. Meet an eco explorer (a person who investigates environmental issues and works to make positive changes.)
    • With the help from an adult, arrange to talk to an eco explorer about their work OR research one in books or online. You could arrange to talk to a traveler (you may get inspired by reading about conservation themed Girl Scout Destinations or talk to a conservationist about their work. You could also research an eco activist (from past or present) who made a difference in an environmental field. Share what you learn with your family!
  2. Explore biodiversity
    • Biodiversity refers to the variety of plant and animal species in an area. It’s a delicate balance of living things that work all together. Find out about biodiversity and new and endangered species in your area and perhaps talk to a person who volunteers at a local nature conservancy or nature preserve. OR learn about biodiversity in farming! Why is biodiversity important in agriculture? Find local farms in your area that have ecofriendly practices, an example: Grassroots Ranch
  3. Investigate a global ecosystem issue 
    • An ecosystem includes plant and animal life, but also refers to nonliving factors such as climate, soil, and water. Dive into issues that affect the global ecosystem by exploring threatened wildlife, an environmental issue relating to water, or exploring the rain forest. Share what you learn with your family. 
  4. Plan a trip to explore and work on an issue
    • After social distancing rules relax, take a trip to a State Park, local lake, or wildlife sanctuary… whichever tracks with your thoughts and ideas from step 4.. 
  5. Share what you learned 
    • Share your hard work with others! Share your findings with a blog or social media post of your trip, identifying what people can do to make a difference in their area. Share photos taken during your trip, videos, etc.
Ambassador

Outdoor Art Master Badge

  1. Make art indoors and outdoors. This is done in two parts, one at the start of the badge and one at the end. 
    • At the start of your badge work, create a black-and-white piece of art indoors. (It doesn’t have to be a picture—it could be a photo collage, sculpture, movie, or any other type of visual art you can think of!) 
    • At the end of the badge, take your supplies outside and re-create the piece of art using the colors you see around you in nature. 
  2. Make something wearable. 
    • Try your hand at making something to wear that interacts with the outdoors—or changes when you go outside and expose it to the elements. 
    • You could make clothes or pieces of jewelry that change color in the sun, use LEDs to make light-up shoes for night walks . . . just get inspired by the outdoors and let your imagination go. 
  3. Build a musical instrument. 
    • Use items from nature to make a multi-toned musical instrument. 
    • You might use a gourd to make a stringed instrument or bamboo to make a flute. 
    • For More FUN: Film your process and make a how-to video for other girls. 
  4. Inspire change. 
    • Documentaries and photographs can be a great way to use art as a call to action. 
    • Dive into a local environmental issue that’s important to you by creating a documentary film or photo series about it, making sure to include ways for people to help. 
    • Choose a virtual platform where you can showcase your film or photos to educate people about your issue. 
  5. Design a landscape. 
    • Research sustainable landscaping and find a place in your community that could benefit from a new or updated landscape. (A garden filled with flowers that need lots of water in a drought-prone area, for example.) 
    • You might talk to a landscaper in your area and look to their landscapes for inspiration. 
    • Then come up with your own design for a landscape that would add to the beauty of an area without causing harm to the environment. 
    • For More FUN: Take the next step—put your plan into action!

Trail Adventure

Help guide another girl in the sport of trail running. Aim at least eight training sessions over a two month period. Do you have a younger sibling interested in training? Do you know of a younger Girl Scout troop? During these social distancing times, get creative! Schedule video calls. Use a run share app to keep one another accountable, etc. 

OR

Plan, prepare, and complete a five-day, four night backpacking trip. Aim for hiking a minimum of 20-25 miles on your trip. 

  1. Choose your outdoor adventure.
    • Talk to a trail running coach and experienced trekker. Reach out to local running organizations, running store local outfitters retailer to meet an expert (phone call, video chat, or email).  Ask what they like best about what they do and then share your thoughts with your family. Or watch videos, read articles, gain as much knowledge as you can!
  2. Plan and prepare! Look online for trail reports from fellow hikers and trail runners. All Trails app is a resource and there are more like that out there. 
  3. Gather your gear. Be prepared with the right gear for your adventure. Try to borrow gear from family or friends so you don’t need to buy it. 
    • Watch this video about gear!  
  4. Set a goal and train for your adventure. What do you hope to accomplish as trail running coach? How far do you want to trek and what challenges do you want to do along the way? Write down a goal for what you want to achieve!
    • Get mentally and physically prepared. Use these training tips, follow safety tips like always training with a trusted friend or adult, make sure another adult know your route and estimated time you should return. Know your route and learn first aid skills for situations that may arise on the trail then take a practice run or hike. 
    • Learn how mental imagery can help you with your outdoor adventures. This means visualizing your coaching sessions or backpacking trek. Go online and search outdoor organizations, publications, retail websites, etc that offer valuable information and advice.
  5. Go on your outdoor adventure! (Many races or campsites may be cancelled during this social distancing time. Use this time to train and prepare for when activities can resume!)
    • Create an action portfolio taking pictures and videos from your training sessions and adventure. Keep an adventure journal of your thoughts and feelings through each phase of your adventures. 

Urban Hiking (verb): taking a walk through your neighborhood or city with a sense of adventure! 

Find natural beauty and fun obstacles right outside your front door! Explore the urban environment around you by wandering through your neighborhood and nearby parks; visiting landmarks and cool buildings; and appreciating the connection between city and nature.

How to get ready for your adventure: 
Step 1: Plan your route - Use Google Maps to locate green spaces, landmarks, or anything else you want to explore within walking distance of your house. Plan your route and get excited about what you’re going to see along the way. Remember to choose roads that aren’t too busy so you can focus your senses on your hike. 

Step 2: Dress and pack appropriately - Check the weather–grab a jacket, hat, and sunglasses, if you need them and don’t forget your sunscreen! Put a water bottle and a snack in your bag and hit the pavement with a family member!

Ways to add adventure to your hike: 

  • Sing a hiking song. Sing a Girl Scouts hiking song while you explore your neighborhood. Here’s a link to great songs to learn and sing as you walk: https://www.youtube.com/user/GirlScoutSongs
  • Find nature all around you. Take breaks to look up at the sky, watch the clouds, feel the sun on your face, and listen to the birds. Wander through the green spaces and parks you find and see what trees, grasses, bugs, and critters live there. Notice differences and similarities along your route. 
  • Write in a journal. Journaling is a great way to record your experiences and your observations as you learn new things about your neighborhood. 
  • Learn about your town’s history and culture. As you walk around you might find old buildings and landmarks that you’ve never noticed before. Write about what you find and look it up when you get home. When was your city founded? Who used to live in your area? What traditions/buildings/businesses have remained and what is different now? 

Share your story with us! We’d love to hear about how you are exploring your city and neighborhood while enjoying nature! Send photos of you/your girl(s) to  news@gseok.org.


Eco Advocate

Discover a nature issue that’s important to you, find solutions, and make a difference. Take the Leave No Trace Online Awareness Course

 

  1. Learn what eco advocates do
    • There are many ways you can advocate for nature! Search for local environmental advocacy groups in your area. Connect through email and learn about what they do, their mission, priority issues, and tips and techniques they use for successful advocacy. 
  2. Find an issue you’re passionate about
    • Everything in nature is important and worth protecting! Is there a local issue that concerns you most? Research environmental issues on the Environmental Protection Agency website, read environmental blogs, local news websites, etc. and choose one issue you want to advocate for.
  3. Come up with a solution
    • How will your solution help? Is it the most practical and realistic idea? Will your solution provide a last impact? With a focus on your issue talk to an expert – a professor? Environmental advocate? Connect through email see if they can help you find out about or brainstorm solutions for your issue. 
  4. Advocate for your issue
    • Create and implement a social media campaign to communicate to the public about your issue OR once social distancing rules expire, volunteer with an existing environmental group or organize an event yourself! 
  5. Teach others how to advocate for your cause
    • Success with advocacy often depends on the people you can rally to help support your cause. By inspiring others to your cause, you ensure that your work will continue to make a difference! Compile your resource materials from your research and create a handout or blog to post including helpful information OR empower your younger siblings or a younger troop by encouraging them to be young activists. Develop games, songs, or activities that support your issue.
Environmental Stewardship (all levels)


STEM

Daisy

Girl Coders offers entry-level coding patches to inspire girls to experience STEM in positive and empowering ways. No prior coding experience needed for Girl Scouts or volunteers/adults! Once a girl has completed a program, girls can then request a free patch on that subject.

Head to GirlCoders.net to get started!

Digital Game Design Badge

  1. Explore tools used to develop digital games 
    • Play a board game that doesn’t involve reading words or numbers, such as connect four, chutes and ladders, or checkers. 
    • How do you know how to play this game? 
    • What are the directions? 
    • Are there pieces or characters in the game that move? 
    • What is the goal of the game, and how do you reach it? 
  2. Plan a maze game Use household objects (like pots and pans, blocks, furniture, stuffed animals, etc) to make a maze in an open space of your home. 
    • You can use blank pieces of printer paper as blank spaces in between obstacles. 
    • See the image below to plan out the maze (the circle is the beginning of the maze, and the star is the end). 
    • Pick your favorite stuffed animal or toy to move through the maze to get to a special prize: a tasty treat! 
    • Give your toy directions (see “Commands” below) to navigate through the maze. It’s OK if your toy gets lost. Help them find the way out!

  3. Build, test, and improve your maze game.
    • Have a sibling, caregiver, or another stuffed animal try to navigate through your maze using the commands. If they have troubles, help them out. 
    • Try rearranging your maze to create new challenges. If your maze doesn’t have any exits, or there’s a dead end at every turn, no problem! 
    • Take a second look at your design, shift some obstacles around, and try it again.

Space Science Explorer 

Space scientists are people who study outer space--what's in the sky. Just like a space scientist, girls will explore and observe the Sun, Moon and stars as they look at the sky and talk about what they see!

  1. Explore the Sun
    • Make a day sky book – go outside and look at the sky three times during the same day. Draw pictures of what you see at the different times of the day.
  2. Observe the Moon
    • Use binoculars or a telescope and look at the Moon like scientists do!
  3. Meet the Stars
    • Make a pretend telescope with a toilet paper tube or rolled-up piece of construction paper. You can even decorate your pretend telescope. Go outside and look at the stars!

Fun Project: Make a pinhole projector

Scientists know that it’s dangerous to look at the Sun, because it can damage their eyes. They use special tools to study the Sun safely. You can do this, too, with a tool called a pinhole projector. With an adult, follow these instructions to make your projector. Then head outside and try it out! After you try it, talk about what you saw.

When a girl has earned this badge, she'll have explored and observed the Sun, Moon, and stars.


NASA at Home

When they've earned this badge, they'll understand more about space science and how they can be a part of NASA now and in the future.

Join in on more exciting space related activities with NASA at Home! NASA has created a website page with opportunities for kids and families to bring the universe to them with E-books, virtual tours, videos, podcasts, and so much more!

https://www.nasa.gov/specials/nasaathome/index.html

Brownie

Girl Coders offers entry-level coding patches to inspire girls to experience STEM in positive and empowering ways. No prior coding experience needed for Girl Scouts or volunteers/adults! Once a girl has completed a program, girls can then request a free patch on that subject.

Head to GirlCoders.net to get started!

Digital Game Design Badge

  1. Discover how game design can be used “for good.”
    • Think about the games you play on a phone, computer or video game console. Do these games teach you new skills? Do you learn things about the world by playing these games? 
  2. Explore tools used to develop digital games.
    • Play a digital game on a phone, computer or video game console. 
    • How do you know how to play this game? 
    • What are the directions? 
    • Are there characters in the game? If so, what do they look like, what are their names? 
    • What is the goal of the game, and how do you reach it? 
  3. Plan a maze game. Use household objects (like pots and pans, blocks, furniture, stuffed animals, etc.) to make a maze in an open space of your home.
    • You can use blank pieces of printer paper as blank spaces in between obstacles. 
    • See the image below to plan out the maze (the circle is the beginning of the maze, and the star is the end). 
    • Pick your favorite stuffed animal or toy to move through the maze to get to a special prize: a tasty treat! 
    • Give your toy directions (see “Commands” below) to navigate through the maze. It’s OK if your toy gets lost. Help them find the way out!

  4.  Build, test, and improve your maze game.
    • Have a sibling, caregiver, or another stuffed animal try to navigate through your maze using the commands. If they have troubles, help them out. 
    • Try rearranging your maze to create new challenges. If your maze doesn’t have any exits, or there’s a dead end at every turn, no problem! 
    • Take a second look at your design, shift some obstacles around, and try it again.

Space Science Adventurer 1 

Whether girls have searched for shooting stars or found shapes in the clouds, they've probably already spent some time looking at the sky. Now is their chance to see the sky in a new way--like a space scientist does! In this badge, they will investigate and learn about the Sun, Moon, planets and stars.

  1. Meet the neighbors
    • Name those planets using a mnemonic device! Come up with your own way to remember the names and the order of the planets in our Solar System by writing a sentence, a poem, or a song that uses the first letter of each planet in order.
  2. See more than before
    • Use a telescope or binoculars and look at the planets or see the stars with a computer with an adult with this link.
  3. Investigate the Moon
    • Make a Moon art project – Make an art project showing the Moon during the day or at night. Use any art form you’d like-be sure to include the shadows and textures you see when you look at the Moon! Look at the pictures of the Moon phases. See the Moon phases here.
  4. Be a stargazer
    • Tell a star story – Find stories about the constellations, after you read it, come up with your own story and share.
  5. Celebrate and share
    • Find a younger girl and tell her what you’ve learned!

When a girl has earned this badge, she'll know how to investigate and learn about the Sun, Moon, planets, and stars.


NASA at Home

When they've earned this badge, they'll understand more about space science and how they can be a part of NASA now and in the future.

Join in on more exciting space related activities with NASA at Home! NASA has created a website page with opportunities for kids and families to bring the universe to them with E-books, virtual tours, videos, podcasts, and so much more!

https://www.nasa.gov/specials/nasaathome/index.html

Junior

Girl Coders offers entry-level coding patches to inspire girls to experience STEM in positive and empowering ways. No prior coding experience needed for Girl Scouts or volunteers/adults! Once a girl has completed a program, girls can then request a free patch on that subject.

Head to GirlCoders.net to get started!

Digital Game Design Badge

  1. Discover how game design can be used “for good.”
    • Think about the games you play on a phone, computer or video game console. Do these games teach you new skills? Do you learn things about the world by playing these games? 
    • Do these games inspire you to help other people?
  2. Explore tools used to develop digital games.
    • Play a digital game on a phone, computer or video game console. 
    • How do you know how to play this game? 
    • What are the directions? 
    • Are there characters in the game? If so, what do they look like, what are their names? 
    • What is the goal of the game, and how do you reach it? 
  3. Plan a maze game. Use household objects (like pots and pans, blocks, furniture, stuffed animals, etc.) to make a maze in an open space of your home.
    • You can use blank pieces of printer paper as blank spaces in between obstacles. 
    • See the image below to plan out the maze (the circle is the beginning of the maze, and the star is the end). 
    • Pick your favorite stuffed animal or toy to move through the maze to get to a special prize: a tasty treat! 
    • Give your toy directions (see “Commands” below) to navigate through the maze. It’s OK if your toy gets lost. Help them find the way out!

  4. Build, test, and improve your maze game.
    • Have a sibling, caregiver, or another stuffed animal try to navigate through your maze using the commands. If they have troubles, help them out. 
    • Try rearranging your maze to create new challenges. If your maze doesn’t have any exits, or there’s a dead end at every turn, no problem! 
    • Take a second look at your design, shift some obstacles around, and try it again.

Space Science Investigator

Venture through the Solar System and beyond, and see the space is even bigger than you may have imagined.

  1. Model the Solar System
    • Make models of the planets using salt dough, instructions here
  2. Circle the Sun
    • Find your age on other planets by going to this website
  3. Discover the stars
    • Go on a night sky scavenger hunt using your eyes, a star wheel, or a smartphone app to find different stars, constellations, or planets
  4. Use the tools to explore
    • Be a mission specialist for a planet – make a travel brochure for tourists on a trip to another planet in our Solar System
  5. Share your sky
    • Create a space show – This might be a song or rap, a skit, a video, a short story, or poem. Create and share with family and friends!

When you’ve earned this badge, you'll understand that the Earth orbits the Sun, and how far away the Sun, Moon, planets, and stars are from our home planet, Earth. 


NASA at Home

When they've earned this badge, they'll understand more about space science and how they can be a part of NASA now and in the future.

Join in on more exciting space related activities with NASA at Home! NASA has created a website page with opportunities for kids and families to bring the universe to them with E-books, virtual tours, videos, podcasts, and so much more!

https://www.nasa.gov/specials/nasaathome/index.html

Cadette

Digital Game Design Badge

  1. Create an avatar.
    • Use this document to brainstorm the features and characteristics of a character or icon in your video game. 
    • Does your character have special items? Magical capabilities? Super powers? Show them in your design. 
  2. Learn how to use arrays to create images.
    • Discover arrays, and how images are created using codes and pixels using this worksheet.
  3. Write an array to create an icon.
    • Using sticky note paper to recreate your avatar from step one on a blank wall. This will represent your array for the avatar. 
    • It may help to use two different colored sets of sticky notes to show the entirety of the grid, and the contrast of your outline. 
  4. Develop a game scenario.
    • Think of the situations you have to navigate and the problems you need to solve while playing a video game. Think of the situations and problems you encounter in your daily life. 
    • These are scenarios, and they set the scene for any good game. Brainstorm some scenarios for your avatar to navigate in your game. Examples: It is the character’s first day at school or the character wants to clean up a beach. 
  5. Play your game,
    • Have a friend or family member create a scenario for your character. 
    • In thirty seconds, try to come up with a solution for your character. Utilize your character’s special abilities and character traits. 
    • Then switch roles and present a different scenario to your partner, and give them thirty seconds to create a solution to the scenario.

Space Science Researcher

Girls will observe and explore light, deepening their understanding of the Sun, stars, and other objects in space.

  1. What more can they see?
    • Create a rainbow – Go outside on a sunny day and turn your back to the Sun. Use water from a garden hose or spray bottle to make a mist in the air. What do you see? How many colors are there? Draw what you observe and write a poem.
  2. Explore "invisible" light
  3. See the stars in a new way
    • Be an astrophotographer – Capture images of stars, planets, and the moon with a digital camera or smartphone and share with others
  4. Expand their vision
    • Be a night sky observer – On a moonless night, when the sky is dark and perfect for stargazing, gather your notebook, a pencil, and flashlight covered with transparent red plastic or cellophane and check out this site to see what’s happening in the sky. What do you see? What color do the stars appear? Draw constellation with notes.
  5. Conserve the night sky
    • Look at light with new eyes – Take pictures of the light fixtures around your home or neighborhood. Find instances of glare, light trespass, unshielded lights, and excess lighting. What are some ways you can take action to reduce the bad lighting near you?

When they've earned this badge, they'll understand more about the amazing properties of light and how they use it to make discoveries about the Universe and space science.


NASA at Home

When they've earned this badge, they'll understand more about space science and how they can be a part of NASA now and in the future.

Join in on more exciting space related activities with NASA at Home! NASA has created a website page with opportunities for kids and families to bring the universe to them with E-books, virtual tours, videos, podcasts, and so much more!

https://www.nasa.gov/specials/nasaathome/index.html

Senior

Digital Game Design Badge

  1. Brainstorm your "game for good" scenario.
    • Come up with a few scenarios for your digital game. Where and when does it take place? What are the situations that will be implicated in its story? 
    • What options can a player of the game take when facing these situations, and what are the consequences of each option? 
    • How can the game be developed into a Take Action project? 
  2. Create a character for your game.
    • Use this worksheet  to develop a character in your game, both in its personality and physicality. 
  3. Develop a decision tree for your game.
    • Think of a scenario; for example, your character encounters an interaction between a bully and a younger student. Come up with various options your character could choose in response to this situation, such as “notify a teacher,” “step in between them” or “walk away.” 
    • Then, create an outcome for each of these options, such as “the teacher steps in and the bully is punished” or “the bully starts targeting your character, but the bullied student joins your side.” 
    • Decide which options lead to the next parts of the game, and which parts result in failure, or GAME OVER.

    • These scenarios, options, and outcomes form a Decision Tree.
  4. Design your game.
    • Continue your Decision Tree from Step 3 until you reach the conclusion of your game. 
    • Expand your game as far as you’d like – if you want some scenarios to have three or four options, add them in! 
    • Just remember to create outcomes for each new option, and allow the story to flow on from at least one option. 
  5. Playtest and iterate your game.
    • Have a friend play your game by reading out the first scenario and the options for the player to take. 
    • Then, follow your friend’s decisions through the game. Let them know if they’ve reached a dead end or GAME OVER, and allow them to start over from the beginning, or return to the last scenario. 
    • If you come to Scenario/Problem #1 Option #1 Option #2 Outcome – CONTINUE STORY Outcome – GAME OVER to a point that doesn’t make much sense or is confusing, adapt your game to make your options more clear. 
    • Your friend can provide feedback on your game, so you can make it stronger or take a new direction.

Space Science Expert

Girls explore light and discover what it teaches them about the Universe!

  1. Uncover the stuff they're made of
    • See how your eyes react to light, for items you will need and instructions , click here
  2. Explore the brilliance of the stars
    • Go on a nighttime scavenger hunt – with a telescope, pair of binoculars, or simply your eyes, see if you can find several different types of objects in the sky. Use a stargazing app or download a sky map here. Draw pictures and take notes of what you see.
  3. Discover telescopes as light collectors
    • Compare your eyes to telescopes – With a friend or family member, experiment with resolution. Have someone hold a penny so you can see it. Walk away until you can no longer distinguish the penny. How far did you go? A telescope with a six-inch diameter can resolve the penny from one mile away.
  4. Find the light in the darkness
    • Join the citizen science movement with NASA, learn more here
  5. Share their knowledge
    • Picture a telescope – Create a piece of visual art. How might you show the parts of a telescope? How might you design your telescope art to be both beautiful and easy to understand? Work from a found image, or from an actual telescope. Share your visual art with family and/or friends.

When they've earned this badge, they'll understand more about the Universe-their place in it and how light is used to make discoveries about it.


NASA at Home

When they've earned this badge, they'll understand more about space science and how they can be a part of NASA now and in the future.

Join in on more exciting space related activities with NASA at Home! NASA has created a website page with opportunities for kids and families to bring the universe to them with E-books, virtual tours, videos, podcasts, and so much more!

https://www.nasa.gov/specials/nasaathome/index.html

Ambassador

Digital Game Design Badge

  1. Brainstorm “game for good” scenarios.
    • Come up with a few scenarios for your digital game. 
    • What are the situations that will be implicated in its story? 
    • What options can a player of the game take when facing these situations, and what are the consequences of each option? 
    • Consider Big Ideas (education initiatives, security precautions), Issues to Address (an attack on the country, a pandemic) and Positive Events (you have been given a grant to build a new library). 
    • How will you address these situations? How can the game inspire its players to take action? 
  2. Create a G.I.R.L. avatar for your game. 
    • Use this worksheet  to develop a character in your game, both in their personality and physicality. 
    • Do you see yourself in this character? Why or why not? 
  3. Learn about decision trees in game design.
    • Think of a scenario; for example, your character encounters an interaction between a bully and a younger student. 
    • Come up with various options your character could choose in response to this situation, such as “notify a teacher,” “step in between them” or “walk away.” 
    • Then, create an outcome for each of these options, such as “the teacher steps in and the bully is punished” or “the bully starts targeting your character, but the bullied student joins your side.” 
    • Decide which options lead to the next parts of the game, and which parts result in failure, or GAME OVER.

    • These scenarios, options, and outcomes form a Decision Tree.
  4. Design your game. 
    • Use this document to create a Decision Tree for your game with multiple branches and layers of complexity. 
    • Continue your Decision Tree until you reach the conclusion of your game.  Expand your game as far as you’d like – if you want some scenarios to have three or four options, add them in! 
    • Just remember to create outcomes for each new option, and allow the story to flow on from at least one option. 
  5. Playtest and iterate your game.
    • Have a friend play your game by reading out the first scenario and the options for the player to take. 
    • Then, follow your friend’s decisions through the game. Let them know if they’ve reached a dead end or GAME OVER, and allow them to start over from the beginning, or return to the last scenario. 
    • If you come to Scenario/Problem #1 Option #1 Option #2 Outcome – CONTINUE STORY Outcome – GAME OVER to a point that doesn’t make much sense or is confusing, adapt your game to make your options more clear. 
    • Your friend can provide feedback on your game, so you can make it stronger or take a new direction.

Space Science Master

Girls explore, observe, design, and communicate their space science discoveries-just like scientists and engineers.

  1. Discover worlds beyond Earth
    • Make a postcard or a tourist brochure – Sci-fi writers invent other worlds all the time, and now it’s your turn! Choose any Solar System body from Mercury to Pluto, an asteroid, and one of the hundreds of moons orbiting in our system. Why would it be an interesting place to visit? What might you see? Go to www.girlscouts.org/planets or to www.girlscouts.org/exoplanets to see some facts and figures to help get you started!
  2. Dive into NASA science
  3. Explore your interests
  4. Dig deeper
    • Contribute to the science community! Throughout the year, NASA offers competitions for students just like you! The competitions are inclusive of a variety of hands-on opportunities including art, essay writing, filmmaking, designing experiments for the Space Station, or creating a cube satellite for launch. Explore your opportunities at www.girlscouts.org/nasastudentcompetitions
  5. Share what they've learned
    • Go digital – Create a digital collage about women in STEM or design a presentation using images from NASA, make an ad for a citizen science project, create a video, the possibilities are limitless!

NASA at Home

When they've earned this badge, they'll understand more about space science and how they can be a part of NASA now and in the future.

Join in on more exciting space related activities with NASA at Home! NASA has created a website page with opportunities for kids and families to bring the universe to them with E-books, virtual tours, videos, podcasts, and so much more!

https://www.nasa.gov/specials/nasaathome/index.html


VIRTUAL

Virtual Tours

Google Arts & Culture teamed up with over 2500 museums and galleries around the world to bring anyone and everyone virtual tours and online exhibits of some of the most famous museums around the world. Google Arts & Culture’s collection includes the British Museum in London, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, the Guggenheim in New York City, and literally hundreds of more places where you can gain knowledge about art, history, and science. 

Virtual Meetings

Thank you all for taking steps to ensure the safety of girls in this difficult time. While we cannot endorse or support specific online meeting tools for your use, we are aware of several tools troops and Service Units are using for virtual meetings. See below for a list of free and low-cost tools that could be useful to you. We encourage troop leaders to look at these and alternative options and discuss with parents and girls to determine what the best solution is for your troop’s needs. 


Video and Audio-Conferencing Tools with free versions 
While all of these options have a free version, please note you may be prompted to consider their upgraded versions for a subscription fee.

  • Zoom - FAQ
    • Note: Meetings durations maximum of 40 minutes in free version
    • If you're holding virtual meetings, check your settings:
      • Change screen sharing to "Host Only"
      • Disable "Join Before Host" 
      • Enabling "Co-Host" so you can assign others to help moderate
      • Disable "File Transfer"
      • Disable "Allow Removed Participants to Rejoin"
  • Skype - Support
    • Note: Up to 10 participants free
  • Webex – Help Center
    • Note: Limited file and content sharing in free version

Chat and Collaboration Tools with free versions

Additional low-cost tools for collaboration and conferencing to consider if the above options do not meet your group's needs.


Post from a troop leader - How I Make Virtual Meetings Work for My Troop

Virtual Resources

Girls Who Code at Home
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Girls Who Code is making CS educational activities available for download free of charge. They will release activities weekly. Each activity will include a feature of a women in tech who pioneered innovative technology.

Girlstart STEM at Home
STEM at Home was created by Girlstart to empower families and communities in STEM. Find free Girlstart curriculum, STEM resources, effective messaging tips, collaboration opportunities. Join the Girlstart newsletter and receive updated information on other online resources.

GoldiBlox STEM at Home
During these uncertain times GoldiBlox is encouraging positivity, creativity, and connection. Visit their creative STEM at Home MakerSpace for fun DIY and STEM inspired projects.

Awesome Girls: Strength in Our Sisterhood.
Girls across the country and around the world are connected through the Girl Scout Movement. Hear from members of the G-TEAM, an elite group of Girl Scouts helping to plan and coordinate national events, about their experiences as part of an international sisterhood, and how being part of our Movement has prepared and supported them during difficult times, like the ones we face now. This recorded webinar is for girls in grades 9-12 (Senior and Ambassador Girl Scouts)!

Videos